Archive for Home Greens

March 30 :: Meatless Mondays

The health benefits of eating flexibly vegetarian – or Flexitarian – benefits both your health and the environment. Livestock accounts for 18% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions and 8% of water use.

A completely meatless diet is 50% more effective at cutting CO2 than switching from a standard car to a hybrid. A flexitarian or vegetarian lifestyle reduces the likelihood of diabetes, heart disease, certain cancers, and obesity and your blood pressure, glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol levels will plunge. Full-time vegetarians live roughly 3.6 years longer than meat eaters; simply reducing meat intake by one day a week increases those same benefits for flexitarians.

For recipes and information about adopting a flexitarian or vegetarian lifestyle visit this great site.

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March 9 :: Shop Like a Locavore

Buying fresh, local, seasonal food reduces the need for transport and, consequently, the burden on the environment. In addition, it is beneficial to the local economy. The presence of local markets enables farmers to grow various crops, thus avoiding monoculture and promoting biodiversity. Buying directly from the farmer strengthens the bond between producer and consumer–and is attractive to both.

Visit http://www.lasvegasfarmersmarket.com for details.

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February 9 :: The 2 Degree Difference

Give your pocket book some relief while reducing your carbon footprint. Turn the heat down a few degrees in the winter and turn the a/c up a few in the summer and see big savings! Each degree gives a 3-4% cost savings.

For even more insulation, install a radiant barrier in
your attic. It will help block out heat during the hot summer months and keep heat in during the winter cold reducing energy usage.

Savings:
By changing the temperature by 2 degrees all year, you can save about 2,000 pounds of CO2 each year!

thermostat

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January 29, 2009 :: Electronics

Tossing millions of computers, TVs, and cell phones into landfills poses serious health and environmental risks. Electronic equipment contains toxic materials, including lead, cadmium, and mercury, that may leak into the soil and ground water when disposed of in landfills. In fact, the average CRT computer monitor contains four to eight pounds of lead on average. Keeping these and other materials found in electronic products, including precious metals and plastics, out of landfills also means they can be recycled, which conserves natural resources.

The good news is that you can de-clutter your home AND protect the environment. Most electronic components can now be reused, recycled, and diverted from the waste stream. For example, approximately 90 percent of computer contents can be reused or recycled. You can help by donating or recycling as many of your electronic items as possible through an environmentally friendly source, spreading the news about e-waste recycling and reuse options to your friends and neighbors, and encouraging your community and companies you do business with to expand responsible electronics waste recycling programs. Visit earth911.com to find local recycling locations and to read more or go to the Blind Center of Nevada to recycle computer equipment locally.

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January 21, 2009 :: Reuse-A-Shoe

Got a pair (or a pile) of old sneakers that are too worn out to give to charity? Nike will recycle any brand of athletic shoe through its Reuse-a-Shoe program. You can drop shoes off at any Niketown store or Nike Factory store; the company also has other drop-off spots, and if there’s not one near you, you can mail shoes in. http://www.nikereuseashoe.com/ The company processes and recycles the footwear to make sports surfaces for basketball courts, tennis courts, running tracks and playgrounds. Right now they’re collecting shoes to make athletic surfaces for New Orleans, to help bring youth sports back to the city as it rebuilds. To date, about 20 million pairs of athletic shoes worldwide have been recycled through the Reuse-A-Shoe program.old-shoes

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January 12: Dry Cleaning and Recycling


Wondering how to get rid of all those wire hangers from the dry cleaner? Some dry cleaners will take them back and reuse them, and some tailors and alteration shops will take them as well — so just ask. And what about all that plastic that comes back from the dry cleaner? In some cities, you can recycle it right along with other plastic bags. And some dry cleaners will take the plastic back and make sure it’s recycled. So yes, there are solutions, but here’s a note of caution to all you dry-cleaning fans: The process uses a harmful chemical known as “perc” that is a suspected carcinogen and has been outlawed in some areas. What to do? Look for cleaners who offer “wet cleaning,” consider hand-washing some garments, or better yet, avoid buying clothes labeled “dry clean only.”

For those of you in Green Valley there is a new, locally owned, organic dry cleaners now in Las Vegas! It’s owned by this sweet couple who have been in the dry cleaning business for years and decided to totally revamp their business to be more ecologically friendly.

Check it out: It’s on South Eastern (9555 S. Eastern, #100) in the strip mall between Silverado Ranch and Serene. It’s on the west side of the street.


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